Nov 082010
 

One of the core reasons why users purchase phones with a Qwerty keyboard can best be summed up as mobile email. Unfortunately, Nokia’s included email client is squarely aimed at casual users – if you are a diehard IMAP junkie, it will not leave you satisfied. Can ProfiMail fill the void?

The first thing you will note about ProfiMail is that it is “different”. And indeed, its layout is somewhat strangle-looking…but allows you to see a preview of the emails in question:
profimail 0 ProfiMail for Symbian   the review

Emails get rendered ‘on request’. ProfiMail can download images, and does a decent job at rendering HTML emails:
profimail 1 ProfiMail for Symbian   the review

Flags are synchronized with the server. This makes keeping track of emails a lot easier, as a message which was replied to on the phone is also replied to on the desktop. Of course, replies are sent home automatically as well:
profimail 2 ProfiMail for Symbian   the review

Messages can be moved to other folders only if you have an active data connection. This is a minor nuisance while roaming; the window is very small and makes hitting the correct folder with a finger difficult:
profimail 4 ProfiMail for Symbian   the review

Attachment support is implemented as it should be. Attachments are shown at the bottom left, and are downloaded on request:
profimail 5 ProfiMail for Symbian   the review

The program is very flexible – it has literally hundreds of settings:
profimail 6 ProfiMail for Symbian   the review

This review looked at version 3.30 of FlexMail on a Nokia N97 mini. The program seems to move its data to the external memory, and thus works well.

In the end, heavy IMAP users have no choice except to cough up the 28$ the manufacturer charges. The program is a bit less powerful than classic email programs like FlexMail for now-ancient Windows Mobile devices, but is by far the best email client for Symbian.

A must have if you do IMAP…

Oct 032007
 

Web browsers for mobile devices have been a difficult issue since the first wireless handhelds appeared – early browsers were slow and lacked features, while later browsers supported more features at the expense of speed. Opera has always been popular for its very fast desktop browsers – can the mobile version stack up?

Opera’s start page is very well-done. Looking a bit plain at first, it soon expands to show the 10 last-visited pages. Web addresses can be entered with ease, the search box is interlinked to Google:
0a Opera 8.65 for Symbian S60   the review 0b Opera 8.65 for Symbian S60   the review

Entering a web address via the ‘goto URL” window pays out big – the program uses an IntelliSense-like approach to simplify entering URL’s:
1a Opera 8.65 for Symbian S60   the review

Opera is among the first mobile web browsers to support multiple windows – however, opening an existing link in a new window is not possible as of now:
2a Opera 8.65 for Symbian S60   the review

Flickr pages can be used on the go – image comments are supported, too. The N71 does not have a load of RAM or phone memory – however, I experienced no out of memory errors even with multiple windows open:
3a Opera 8.65 for Symbian S60   the review

Another stunning feature of Opera is the support for dynamic menus – this example is from Resco’s web site:
4a Opera 8.65 for Symbian S60   the review 4b Opera 8.65 for Symbian S60   the review

Web pages can be zoomed in and out flexibly, a fullscreen mode is available for maximizing display area:
5a Opera 8.65 for Symbian S60   the review 5b Opera 8.65 for Symbian S60   the review
5c Opera 8.65 for Symbian S60   the review5d Opera 8.65 for Symbian S60   the review

The desktop version of YouTube is rendered perfectly, too – however, videos are not shown due to lack of a flash player on my N71:
6a Opera 8.65 for Symbian S60   the review 6b Opera 8.65 for Symbian S60   the review 6c Opera 8.65 for Symbian S60   the review

When downloading a file, Opera first asks you if the file should be squeezed into your phone’s memory or saved to an external memory card. After that, it switches to a download manager view. The whole process works very well…except that files get removed from the list when Opera is restarted:
7a Opera 8.65 for Symbian S60   the review 7b Opera 8.65 for Symbian S60   the review

This review looked at Opera 8.65 on a Nokia N71. Data connection was provided by Hutchison Austria’s 3G network. Opera can be installed to an external memory card and needs about 3MB of memory.

Cutting a long story short – Opera for S60 is the best web browser ever used on a mobile device. The program tackles all web pages thrown at it and delivers superior rendering quality for all elements at insanely high speeds. If Opera would manage to improve its ‘tabbed browsing’ and download manager, this could be the zen of browsers. As it stands now, the price of approx. 20€ is a steal for everyone who surfs the web with his phone often.